Katy, TX. 281-395-2225

The Wellness Centre - Health Spa | Katy, TX Well-Polished-Logo acupuncture_page

As one of the world’s oldest healing practices, acupuncture aims to restore and maintain your health through the stimulation of specific points on your body. At The Wellness Centre, we incorporate healing traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries in an effort to achieve the very best results. Our needles are so fine that you probably won’t feel any pain at all!

Make sure to inform the acupuncturist about all treatments and medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you may have.

Obtain a sense of balance and wholeness with acupuncture.

Acupuncture

New patient consults include examination, evaluation, treatment plan, and initial treatment.

Eastern Healing Therapies

30 min.

$ 80

60 min.

$ 120

Multi-Session ACU pack

60 minute session; pre-pay; cannot be transferred.

3 sessions

$ 225

6 sessions

$ 420

CUPPING

A time-honored technique where glass cups are applied to the surface of the skin which creates a mild suction to infuse fresh oxygen-rich circulation into the tired, stressed muscles.

30 min.

$ 45

Multi-Session CUPPING pack

30 minute session; pre-pay; cannot be transferred.

3 sessions

$ 110

6 sessions

$ 200

CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

Chinese herbal medicine is a major aspect of traditional Chinese medicine focuses on restoring a balance of energy, body, and spirit to maintain health rather than treating a particular disease or medical condition.

$ 40

About Acupuncture

Acupuncture is among the oldest healing practices in the world. As part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), acupuncture aims to restore and maintain health through the stimulation of specific points on the body. In the United States, where practitioners incorporate healing traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries, acupuncture is considered part of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

 

The term "acupuncture" describes a family of procedures involving the stimulation of anatomical points on the body using a variety of techniques. The acupuncture technique that has been most often studied scientifically involves penetrating the skin with thin, solid, metallic needles that are manipulated by the hands or by electrical stimulation.

 

Practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years, acupuncture is one of the key components of traditional Chinese medicine. In TCM, the body is seen as a delicate balance of two opposing and inseparable forces: yin and yang. Yin represents the cold, slow, or passive principle, while yang represents the hot, excited, or active principle. According to TCM, health is achieved by maintaining the body in a "balanced state"; disease is due to an internal imbalance of yin and yang. This imbalance leads to blockage in the flow of qi (vital energy) along pathways known as meridians. Qi can be unblocked, according to TCM, by using acupuncture at certain points on the body that connect with these meridians. Sources vary on the number of meridians, with numbers ranging from 14 to 20. One commonly cited source describes meridians as 14 main channels "connecting the body in a weblike interconnecting matrix" of at least 2,000 acupuncture points.

 

Acupuncture became better known in the United States in 1971, when New York Times reporter James Reston wrote about how doctors in China used needles to ease his pain after surgery. American practices of acupuncture incorporate medical traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries.

 

The report from a Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1997 stated that acupuncture is being "widely" practiced—by thousands of physicians, dentists, acupuncturists, and other practitioners-for relief or prevention of pain and for various other health conditions. According to the 2002 National Health Interview Survey—the largest and most comprehensive survey of CAM use by American adults to date—an estimated 8.2 million U.S. adults had ever used acupuncture, and an estimated 2.1 million U.S. adults had used acupuncture in the previous year.

What To Expect from Your Acupuncture Visits

During your first office visit, the practitioner may ask you at length about your health condition, lifestyle, and behavior. The practitioner will want to obtain a complete picture of your treatment needs and behaviors that may contribute to your condition. Inform the acupuncturist about all treatments or medications you are taking and all medical conditions you have.

 

Acupuncture needles are metallic, solid, and hair-thin. People experience acupuncture differently, but most feel no or minimal pain as the needles are inserted. Some people feel energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient, or a defect in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment. This is why it is important to seek treatment from a qualified acupuncture practitioner.

 

Treatment may take place over a period of several weeks or more.

Acupuncture New Patient Session (60 to 90 Minutes)

First visit includes thorough examination, as well as treatment where tiny needles are inserted into points located on the body, which work to correct and rebalance the flow of energy and restore health.

Acupuncture Follow Up Care (45 to 60 minutes)

Tertiary visits where a complete system of healing is performed to provide effective treatment for numerous conditions. This system involves insertion of tiny needles into points located on the body, which work to correct and rebalance the flow of energy and consequently relieve pain and/or restore health.

Cupping

An ancient Chinese practice in which a cup is applied to the skin and the pressure in the cup is reduced (by using change in heat or by suctioning out air), so that the skin and superficial muscle layer is drawn into and held in the cup. Generally, the cup is left in place for about 10 minutes (typical range is 5–15 minutes). The skin becomes reddened due to the congestion of blood flow.

Herbal Consult

Herbal Consult includes a Chinese medical diagnosis for condition being treated and appropriate Chinese herbal formula dispensed.

 

Chinese herbal medicine is a major aspect of traditional Chinese medicine, which focuses on restoring a balance of energy, body, and spirit to maintain health rather than treating a particular disease or medical condition. Herbs are used with the goal of restoring balance by nourishing the body. Chinese Herbal Medicine is dispensed primarily in the form of capsules, tablets or tiny tea pills.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese herbal medicine has been used as a form of treatment for a multitude of ailments ranging from acute infections to chronic fatigue. There are hundreds of commonly used individual herbs that are nearly always used in combination with other herbs to counteract possible side effects and address various aspects of an illness.

 

The prescribing of Chinese herbal medicine is based upon an individual diagnosis using the techniques of pulse and tongue evaluation in conjunction with the reading of other signs and symptoms to form a unique pattern diagnosis. This diagnosis and it's resulting choice of formula(s) is based on training in Oriental medical theory which is the basis for not only the selection of Chinese herbal medicine but also the proper selection of acupuncture points.

 

Chinese herbal medicine is quite powerful in its effect. In the case of certain acute illnesses, the effect can be felt immediately (e.g. sinusitis, bronchitis, hives, colds). When treating chronic illness or cases of deficiency (e.g. anemia, chronic fatigue etc.) the effect may take some time often ranging from 2 weeks to several months.

 

This aspect of Chinese herbal medicine is unique in that it allows the practitioner to determine a particular weakness in the body's system and prescribe a form of tonic that specifically addresses that weakness.

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